Summary of lawrence lessigs why crush

Yet its neglect remains puzzling. While the sisters are talking, they spot a mole in the grass. As the two sisters are walking home, they bump into Tom Smedley, a young man who is fond of Frances. They tell him about the mole they killed, and Tom tells Frances that moles are pests.

Summary of lawrence lessigs why crush

Sara Miles Review Consensus: All agree that Lessig brings up important questions though they -- the fools! Presentation could be clearer, language less legalistic. When analyzing these individual trouble spots, the author reveals himself to be a deep, lucid and well-read thinker.

Summary of lawrence lessigs why crush

Similarly the illustrative quotes chosen here are merely those the complete review subjectively believes represent the tenor and judgment of the review as a whole. We acknowledge and remind and warn you that they may, in fact, be entirely unrepresentative of the actual reviews by any other measure.

Lawrence Lessig, the author of Code, is a professor of law, and Code is emphatically a book about the law. The brave new world of cyberspace and technological innovation and advancement in general brings with it a wealth of interesting consequences.

The legal implications may, at first sight, not seem to be the most riveting of these. The Internet seems, at first glance, a place without rules and government, a beautiful, anarchic free-for-all beyond the bounds of government interference.

In fact, of course, the Internet is as hidebound and rulebound as most anything else, different very different!

Lawrence Lessig: Decriminalizing the Remix - TIME

From technological constraints and rules -- basic protocols governing the functioning of data transfer -- to how domain names are assigned and what activity has been criminalized "hacking", child pornography, etc.

As Lessig points out, the influence of both must be understood, as both will determine the shape of the future. The difference between the two types of code is obvious enough throughout the text; nevertheless, the use of the same word for these very different areas occasionally gets irritating.

This may have sounded like a fun idea to Lessig and it probably goes over well in the classroombut it is really just pointless obfuscation. Lessig correctly points out that the law, as currently written, is ill-equipped to deal with the new frontiers of cyberspace.

He warns that deciding legal and regulatory issues in cyberspace according to the system on which our other laws are based is fraught with danger. Property is not the same in cyberspace.

Privacy is not the same. Sovereignty is not the same. Indeed, very little is the same. It almost sounds like heresy to talk about regulation of the Internet, but, of course, there is a structure to it, there are protocols and regulations governing it.

Summary of Lawrence Lessig's "Why Crush Them" Essay Example | Graduateway

Regulation is both necessary and inevitable. And, Lessig reminds us, regulation comes from within as well -- not imposed by government, but imposed by code itself i.

Because this form of regulation is often invisible to most users of the technology it is particularly insidious and poses a great threat. Lessig finds four constraints that regulate behaviour: Each of these can influence the others as well. Of greatest interest to Lessig are law and architecture.Nov 16,  · Then the chapter moves to a sort of summary of how these codes differ, the code of law and the code of the Internet.

The problems lie in that we have dealt with security on the web for a drop in the bucket compared to private property, Internet code has about years of catching up to do. Summary of “Why Crush Them?” by Lawrence Lessig As the technological age has approached and developed the definition of creativity has broadly expanded.

The editing and reordering of a song or movie is the art of which we call remixing. Lester Lawrence Lessig III (born June 3, ) is an American academic, attorney, and political activist. He is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the former director of the Edmond J.

Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. Sep 08,  · Lessig goes on to talk about "media literacy" and the importance that kids of future generations be literate in this field. The was children should be taught to understand, make, and add to the media is to learn with practice, to create there own media.

Lester Lawrence "Larry" Lessig III (born June 3, ) is an American academic, attorney, and political activist. He is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the former director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.

Lessig was a candidate for the Democratic Party 's nomination for President of the United States in the U.S. presidential. Summary of Lawrence Lessig's "Why Crush Them" Essay. As the technological age has approached and developed the definition of creativity has broadly expanded - Summary of Lawrence Lessig's "Why Crush Them" Essay introduction.

The editing and reordering of a .

Lawrence Lessig: The unstoppable walk to political reform | TED Summaries